library

Library

The NCISI Library is a critical vehicle for sharing up-to-date information on the reforms that are happening within the state and across the country, as well as research and best practices in the area of supported employment and full inclusion of people with developmental and intellectual disabilities.
The NCISI Library will be updated frequently as new promising practices are identified.
The NCISI Library will also archive videos of consumers, family members and people within the state who have a perspective on improving the lives of people with developmental and intellectual disabilities.

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Latest Addition to the Library

Improved Airline Accessibility In The Works

The U.S. Department of Transportation is planning to move forward with new regulations mandating greater accessibility for people with disabilities when they fly.  After seven months of negotiations, an advisory

RI Tries to Improve Assessment Used for DD Funding; Families Not Feeling It Yet

A two-hour discussion about the Supports Intensity Scale, used by Rhode Island to assign funding to adults with developmental disabilities, exposed a big gap between the vision of the professionals

Fate of Wandering Bill in Limbo

A last-minute twist that caught advocates by surprise is threatening to derail legislation to create new federal resources for those with autism and other developmental disabilities who are at risk

Schools Won't Face Penalty for Serving Too Many In Special Education

AUSTIN, Texas — Facing increasing criticism over its special education enrollment benchmark, the Texas Education Agency this month told schools that they must provide services to all eligible students with

More People with Disabilities Seeking Work

After improving significantly, the unemployment rate for Americans with disabilities is ticking back up as more people within this population look to join the workforce. Numbers released late last week

Parent Led Intervention May Reduce Autism Severity

For the first time, researchers say they have evidence that parent-led intervention for young kids with autism continues to yield gains several years later. Children who participated in an intervention